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Seven Years, Never Forgotten

7 Jul

James Adams, 32
Samantha Badham, 36
Lee Baisden, 34
Phil Beer, 22
Anna Brandt, 41
Michael Stanley Brewster, 52
Ciaran Cassidy, 22
Rachelle Lieng Siong Chung For Yuen, 27
Benedetta Ciaccia, 30
Elizabeth Daplyn, 26
Jonathan Downey, 34
Richard Ellery, 21
Anthony Fatayi-Williams, 26
David Foulkes, 22
Arthur Edlin Frederick, 60
Karolina Gluck, 29
Jamie Gordon, 30
Richard Gray, 41
Gamze Gunoral, 24
Lee Harris, 30
Giles Hart, 55
Marie Hartley, 34
Miriam Hyman, 31
Ojara Ikeagwu, 55
Shahara A Islam, 20
Neetu Jain, 37
Emily Rose Jenkins, 24
Adrian Johnson, 38
Helen Jones, 28
Susan Levy, 53
Sam Ly, 28
Shelley Mather, 26
Mike Matsushita, 37
James Mayes, 28
Anne Moffat, 48
Colin Morley, 52
Behnaz Mozakka, 48
Jennifer Nicholson, 24
Mihaela Otto, 46
Shyanuja Parathasangary, 30
Anat Rosenberg, 29
Philip Russell, 28
Atique Sharifi, 24
Ihab Slimane, 24
Christian Small, 28
Fiona Stevenson, 29
Monika Suchocka, 23
Carrie Taylor 24
Mala Trivedi, 51
Laura Susan Webb, 29
William Wise, 54
Gladys Wundowa, 50

Adios Mark Ramprakash!

6 Jul


A fan shaking hands with Mark Ramprakash on the day he went on to score his 98th first-class century against Lancashire. [Taken 16 Apr 2008]

He’s one of the few English cricketers I remember dad telling me about as a boy. As a Briton with Asian heritage he always intrigued me, not least for the fact that both parts of his surname feature in my own. But despite a glittering twenty-five year career, Mark Ramprakash was unable to fulfil his prodigious talent on the sport’s biggest stage, Test cricket. His average of 27.32 in 52 Tests (with just two hundreds) pales in comparison with his first-class record of 35,659 runs at an average of 53.14 (with 114 first-class hundreds), along with 13,273 runs in one-day cricket. It is a distinct possibility that he will remain the last cricketer to ever score a hundred first-class centuries, a landmark he reached during the 2008 County Championship. I was fortunate enough to watch him in action earlier that season when he notched his 98th first-class century at The Oval in a rain-affected match against Lancashire. He was always one of the more stylish English batsman of his generation and many will rue the fact that he will perhaps be remembered not so much for his run-accumulation, but for his success in a reality dance competition in 2006. Thanks Ramps for the entertainment and I wish him all the best in the future. Along with Graeme Hick’s retirement four years ago, this truly is the end of English cricket’s 1980s era.

LINK:
England’s flawed technician (David Lloyd, Cricinfo)
A champion of elegance in helmet and pads (Jim White, The Telegraph)

Hello world!

4 Jul

I’ll be blogging here on a variety of topics including London, British politics, English law, human rights, India, Oman, Sport (particularly football, cricket and tennis), music, etymology and anything else that catches my fancy.

Look forward to you joining me on this cyberspace journey.

In the meantime, Happy American Independence Day!